Brandon Rittiman
Channel 2 News

Recently revealed court documents show warning signs that Jaycee Dugard's accused kidnapper showed warning signs of sexual attraction to young girls during his prior rape case in the 1970's.

Prosecutors say Phillip Garrido tried and failed to kidnap a young woman before he kidnapped Katie Callaway on November 22, 1976.

An hour later, 25-year-old casino worker Katie Callaway gave the wrong person a ride.

Phillip Garrido got in her car at a South Lake Tahoe grocery store. Not long after, he grabbed her.

"He maneuvered me into the passenger seat," Katie Callaway-Hall recalls, "he put my head in my lap and he tied my head to my knees, with my hands handcuffed behind me."

Garrido drove her to a mini-storage warehouse on Mill Street in Reno.

Inside, he raped her for several hours before police busted him.

Garrido was married to his first wife at the time, Christine Murphy.

"[The marriage] fell apart because of his neediness for sex," Murphy explains.

After his arrest, a court-appointed psychiatrist diagnosed Phillip Garrido with "mixed sexual deviation and chronic drug abuse."

He mainly abused LSD, testifying that he sometimes id 10 hits of acid at once.

At the Federal trial, Garrido admitted to what he did to Callaway.

As a defense, Garrido said he couldn't control his sexual fantasies and perversions, which included pleasuring himself in public places on a daily basis.

Sometimes he would satisfy himself in neighborhoods as a peeping tom, watching women through their home windows.

Other times he did it while watching little girls, as he explained to his lawyer on the stand.

Garrido: "I have done it by the side of schools, grammar schools and high schools, in my own car while I was watching young females."

Attorney: "How old were they, would you guess?"

Garrido: "From seven to ten."

Attorney: "Did you ever expose or exhibit yourself on those occasions?"

Garrido: "A few times."

At the trial, Katie Callaway told jurors Garrido threatened "someday I just might come back and tell you who I am."

Callaway now says he did "come back" about a decade after the trial.

She still worked at a Lake Tahoe casino.

"He came up to my roulette wheel and very threateningly said 'Hello, Katie.' "

That's how Callaway learned that Garrido made parole.

The Nevada parole board determined Garrido was a "moderate" risk, and that 126 months (10 1/2 years) was enough time served.

Despite his own testimony on the record about his lust for little girls, they allowed Garrido to return to society.

Just a few years later, police say he acted on his fantasy, kidnapping 11-year-old Jaycee Dugard in south lake Tahoe...

He allegedly raped her repeatedly in his backyard compound for 18 years, while married to his current wife Nancy Garrido.

All that time, parole officers had him under lifetime supervision.

Experts call it a system-wide failure.

"They may not have violated their own rules," says Jonathan Simon with the UC Berkeley law school, "but I think it's pretty clear that they violated what would be considered good parole practice."

Katie Callaway says she now feels some guilt that her rape case didn't keep him behind bars for good.

"I want him put away forever or I want him executed," declared Callaway, "I know that's harsh, but I'm sorry. I wish that he had never gotten out."

Recently revealed court documents show warning signs that Jaycee Dugard's accused kidnapper showed warning signs of sexual attraction to young girls during his prior rape case in the 1970's.