Author Tom Wolfe, who chronicled everything from hippies to the space race before turning his sharp eye to fiction, has died. He was 88.

Wolfe's agent Lynn Nesbit told The Associated Press that Wolfe died in a New York City hospital while battling an infection. 

Wolfe had been living in New York since 1962, when he started reporting for the New York Herald Tribune. The writer pioneered New Journalism, a 1960s and 1970s literary movement characterized by colorful long-form pieces written in a subjective voice. Wolfe was associated with other New Journalism writers like Hunter S. Thompson, Joan Didion and Truman Capote.

The "new journalism" reporter and novelist insisted that the only way to tell a great story was to go out and report it. His writing style was rife with exclamation points, italics and improbable words.

Among his acclaimed books were "The Right Stuff" and "The Bonfire of the Vanities," a satire of Manhattan-style power and justice that became one of the best-selling books of the '80s.

His last published book was "The Kingdom of Speech," which challenged society's understanding of Darwinism.

In it, he argued that speech, not evolution, is responsible for humanity's highest achievements. He skewered the man who introduced evolution to the masses: Charles Darwin along with famed linguist Noam Chomsky.

(The Associated Press, CBS News contributed to this report.)