President Trump Signs Budget Deal, Ending Federal Government Shu - KTVN Channel 2 - Reno Tahoe Sparks News, Weather, Video

President Trump Signs Budget Deal, Ending Federal Government Shutdown

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President Donald Trump on Friday signed a $400 billion budget deal that sharply boosts spending and swells the federal deficit, ending a brief federal government shutdown that happened while most Americans were home in bed and most government offices were closed, anyway.

Trump tweeted, "Just signed Bill. Our Military will now be stronger than ever before. We love and need our Military and gave them everything - and more. First time this has happened in a long time. Also means JOBS, JOBS, JOBS!"

The House narrowly passed the budget accord in the pre-dawn hours, ending a brief government shutdown and clearing a path for huge spending increases for both the Pentagon and domestic programs.

Passage came over the objections Democratic leaders who demanded the promise of a vote to protect "Dreamer" immigrants brought to the country illegally as children

Earlier, the House narrowly passed the sweeping bipartisan budget accord, ending an hours-long government shutdown and clearing a path for huge spending increases for both the Pentagon and domestic programs.

The 240-186 vote sends the $400 billion spending plan to President Trump who signed it. 

The government shut down at midnight Thursday after Kentucky GOP Sen. Rand Paul blocked plans for a quick Senate vote, blaming his fellow Republicans for being “complicit” in the looming return of trillion-dollar budget deficits.

Senators voted 71-28 to approve the deal, easily overcoming objections from Republican fiscal conservatives who say the bill marks a return to unchecked deficit spending.

Beyond $300 billion worth of increases for the military and domestic programs, the agreement adds $89 billion in overdue disaster aid for hurricane-slammed Texas, Florida and Puerto Rico, a politically charged increase in the government's borrowing cap and a grab bag of health and tax provisions. There's also $16 billion to renew a slew of expired tax breaks that Congress seems unable to kill.

"I love bipartisanship, as you know," said Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz. "But the problem is the only time we discover bipartisanship is when we spend more money."

The deal contains far more money demanded by Democrats than had seemed possible only weeks ago.

"We're not going to get DACA as part of this," said Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky, the top Democrat on the Budget Committee. "So if we can negotiate a deal like I think we've gotten that essentially meets every other one of our priorities then I think that's where a lot of the Democrats are."

(The Associated Press, CBS News contributed to this report.)

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