How Local Medical Staff Prepares for Potential Emergencies - KTVN Channel 2 - Reno Tahoe Sparks News, Weather, Video

How Local Medical Staff Prepares for Potential Emergencies

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With the most recent events around the country, it might make you ask the question, what if that would happen here? Could we ever be prepared enough? According to officials, the answer is no, you can never be fully prepared, but you can at least have a game plan and be somewhat prepared. 

The Reno Air Races tested our medical staff in 2011. They had a game plan, and around 50 people were able to be transported to our local hospitals in a short amount of time. While we were prepared, the community is still fixing and tweaking our emergency response plan to make it better. There's always something to learn, not only with plane crashes but other tragedies as well. 

"We take tragedies, such as the Las Vegas tragedy, and we take a look at them. We review them, and we scrutinize them, so we can figure out how we can make our plan better," said Brian Taylor, Emergency Manger for REMSA. 

He says they've made more than fifteen adjustments to their plan since the air races crash in 2011.There are many other trainings taking place behind the scenes that we don't know about. For example, training for earthquakes or mass shootings.

"To bear the brunt of a large amount of patients we had in Las Vegas, that would be extremely challenging, and it would test any plan, but our plan is well thought out and solid," said Taylor. 

On the day of the air races tragedy, Renown alone took in about thirty seven patients in a short amount of time. Treating a mass influx of patients plays a big role in their training.

"At our level two trauma center we regularly practice more than a dozen times a year these include drills, full scale drills, table top drills, and actually live events," said Michael Munda of  Renown. 

Which means the community is always learning and preparing while hoping for the best. The public can get prepared too by taking classes on how to help themselves, or those nearby, if you have to wait for medication attention to get to you. For more information, REMSA's phone number is 775-858-5700. 

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