Bone Drugs, Sleep-Aids & Pediatric Cancers - KTVN Channel 2 - Reno Tahoe Sparks News, Weather, Video

Bone Drugs, Sleep-Aids & Pediatric Cancers

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The most-widely used osteoporosis drugs may not protect women from breast cancer. Researchers from University of California, San Francisco looked at data from two clinical trials and found no major difference in breast cancer rates between women who took the drugs known as bisphosphonates and those who took a placebo. Previous studies suggested post-menopausal women who took the drugs to prevent fractures were also less likely to get breast cancer.

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Shift workers often take drugs to help them stay awake or fall sleep, but a new look at the science shows there's little evidence the drugs provide much benefit. 

People who work irregular hours can have problems with staying awake and falling asleep, which can affect their health. Looking at data from multiple studies researchers say while sleep medications can be considered for temporary use some do not offer any benefit with continuous use and may have serious side effects.

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And researchers at UT Southwestern have identified a gene that may play a role in the development of childhood cancers.

The study, done on mice, could lead to new ways to target pediatric cancers.

More research is needed to see if the findings apply to people.

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