Pregnancy Inductions, Vitamin D & Obesity - KTVN Channel 2 - Reno Tahoe News Weather, Video -

Pregnancy Inductions, Vitamin D & Obesity

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Fewer pregnant women are being induced to deliver early. New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and prevention show the rate of labor inductions has declined the last two years. That follows nearly two decades of increases. The report suggests doctors may no longer be inclined to deliver between weeks 35 and 38, because studies show infants born during these week don't do as well as those delivered later in pregnancy.

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New research shows a link between low levels of vitamin D and higher risk of death from all causes, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. The main source of vitamin D is sunshine. Researchers in Germany found Vitamin D deficiency is especially common among the elderly who often have less exposure to the sun.

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And people who live in neighborhoods that are conducive to walking are 13% less likely to develop diabetes than people who live in places that have more "sprawl." Researchers in Canada also found during a 10-year period, obesity fell by 9% in more walkable neighborhoods while it rose 13% in neighborhoods where people are more dependent on their cars.
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