Blueberries, red grapes may boost body's immune function - KTVN Channel 2 - Reno Tahoe News Weather, Video -

Blueberries, red grapes may boost body's immune function

Updated: Sep 17, 2013 02:22 PM
© iStockphoto.com / Joe Biafore © iStockphoto.com / Joe Biafore
  • Wendy Damonte's Health Watch ReportsMore>>

  • Request Remind Me 2 Kit

    Request a Remind Me 2 Kit

         More >>
  • Fish and Pregnant Women

    Fish and Pregnant Women

    Thursday, August 21 2014 7:37 PM EDT2014-08-21 23:37:10 GMT
    In June the government put out new recommendations telling Americans to eat more fish because of the health benefits. But a new analysis from Consumer Reports says pregnant women should avoid one of the most popular types of fish.
    More >>
    In June the government put out new recommendations telling Americans to eat more fish because of the health benefits. But a new analysis from Consumer Reports says pregnant women should avoid one of the most popular types of fish.More >>
  • Type O Blood Donors Urgently Needed at United Blood Services

    Type O Blood Donors Urgently Needed at United Blood Services

    Thursday, August 21 2014 3:02 PM EDT2014-08-21 19:02:08 GMT
    United Blood Services is reaching out to all type O donors for a blood donation since their inventories of type O blood is very low today and they need to build inventories going into the long Labor Day weekend.More >>
    United Blood Services is reaching out to all type O donors for a blood donation since their inventories of type O blood is very low today and they need to build inventories going into the long Labor Day weekend.More >>

TUESDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Red grapes and blueberries may give your immune system a boost, according to a new study.

Researchers found that both fruits contain compounds called stilbenoids, which work with vitamin D to increase expression of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene, which is involved in immune function.

The stilbenoid compounds included resveratrol in red grapes and pterostilbene in blueberries.

"Out of a study of hundreds of compounds, just these two popped right out," Adrian Gombart, a principal investigator at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, said in a university news release.

"Their synergy with vitamin D to increase CAMP gene expression was significant and intriguing," said Gombart, an associate professor in the university's college of science. "It's a pretty interesting interaction."

Gombart and colleagues noted, however, that these findings were made in laboratory cell cultures and do not prove that eating blueberries and red grapes would boost a person's immune function.

The study was published Sept. 17 in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research.

The CAMP gene has been shown to play a key role in the innate immune system -- the body's first line of defense that gives it the ability to fight bacterial infection. The response is especially crucial as many antibiotics become less effective.

Previous research has found a strong association between adequate vitamin D levels and the function of the CAMP gene. This new study suggests that certain other compounds may play a role as well.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases has more about the immune system.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and Sarkes Tarzian, Inc. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.