AP: Authorities Recover Pressure Cooker Lid - KTVN Channel 2 - Reno Tahoe News Weather, Video -

AP: Authorities Recover Pressure Cooker Lid

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Authorities investigating the deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon have recovered a piece of circuit board that they believe was part of one of the explosive devices, and also found the lid of a pressure cooker that apparently was catapulted onto the roof of a nearby building.

A law enforcement official briefed on the investigation confirmed to The Associated Press on Wednesday that authorities have recovered what they believe are some of the pieces of the explosive devices. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because this person was not authorized to publicly discuss evidence in the ongoing investigation.

A person close to the investigation previously told AP the bombs consisted of explosives put in 1.6-gallon pressure cookers, one with shards of metal and ball bearings, the other with nails. 

The trauma surgery chief at Boston Medical Center says most of the injuries his hospital treated after the marathon bombings were to the lower extremities.

Dr. Peter Burke says the hospital treated 23 people following the blasts, and 19 remained there on Wednesday morning. He says two patients, including a 5-year-old child, remain critical, but says all the patients are making progress and are expected to survive.

Dozens of others have been released from hospitals around Boston.

Massachusetts General Hospital says all but 12 of the 31 people sent there have been released. Eight are critical. 

Beth Israel still has 13 of the 24 people sent there. Boston Children's has three remaining of its original 10 patients; and Tufts Medical Center has released half of its 14 bombing patients.

The father of one of the three people who died in the Boston Marathon bombings was at first told that his daughter had survived, but was in surgery and could lose a leg.

When William Campbell arrived at Massachusetts General Hospital, however, he learned that his daughter, 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, had died.

Krystle's grandmother, Lillian Campbell, told multiple media outlets that her granddaughter and a friend were together at the marathon and lay side by side on the ground after the bombs went off.

Somewhere on the way to the hospital, their names got mixed up.

Lillian Campbell says her son was "devastated" when he found out the truth and almost passed out.

Krystle Campbell was a restaurant manager who grew up in Medford but had moved to Arlington. 

FIFA President Sepp Blatter has written to the mayor of Boston expressing "distress at the cruel bombings" at the city's marathon.

Blatter wrote to Thomas M. Menino condemning the "cowardly actions, which are not only an attack on the citizens of Boston, but also on sport itself and its ethics of discipline, respect and fair play."

FIFA published excerpts of the letter -- also sent to Thomas Grilk, the executive director of the Boston Athletic Commission -- on its website Wednesday.

Two bombs exploded near the finish line of Monday's race, killing three people and wounding more than 170.

Blatter wrote that "my immediate thoughts and sympathies go out to the victims and their families."

(AP)

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