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ACL Injuries

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In any sport, injuries happen.

Sprains, strains and tears are common especially when it comes to the knee ligament known as the anterior cruciate ligament or ACL.

"It is the ligament that runs from your femur bone, your thigh bone to your shin bone and basically what it does is hold the knee joint together."

Doctors say, ACL injuries can happen to anyone, even the weekend warrior. Many require surgery and long bouts of rehabilitation.

"So the minimum is 6 to 12 months for recovery time."

According to specialists at Ohio State University, athletes usually favor a certain part of their bodies, such as the trunk, thigh muscles, knees, or feet when they jump and land. Those who use their knees, or are ligament dominant, are more prone to ACL injuries. But all styles can cause an injury. Now OSU researchers are using simple screening techniques to assess the athlete's body use.

"Is he quadriceps dominant? Is he ligament dominant? Is he leg dominant, is he trunk dominant? We look at his specific profile, his specific muscle balance or dominance patterns and then we design a neuromuscular training program"

The techniques are so accurate that the NBA has asked OSU researchers to help identify which of their athletes are at high risk and to come up with programs to try and prevent injuries.

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